Thingy’s pregnant! Well she better not count her chickens

I’m at that age, early thirties, where 2017 has been a baby-booming year. Speaking of booming, pregnancies are a bit like a ticking time bomb. Is the pin going to stay safely in? Or, is it going to drop and all end?

I spoke in a previous post about the green-eyed monster – being jealous of other people’s pregnancies when my first one ended in misery and the deepest bitterness. The news now is like someone standing next to a balloon with a sharp object for nine months. I know it’s cynical, and nothing really to do with me, but it’s the flood of emotion I feel when I hear someone’s news.

The reliving my first time – the positive pregnancy test, the visions of a baby in nine months time, going to the scans, going baby shopping, the birth, their first tooth…and so on. It’s there, like a wave of motherhood washing over you, before it’s all really begun. A poppy seed in fact, buried deep in your womb.

The termination that sticks in your memory forever – the letters ’TFMR’ branded on the side of your frontal lobe. The promise you once had dissolved into an appointment at a clinic, throwing you back into the past where you were 16 weeks earlier – baby-less and never-to-be-the-same-again.

For anyone who has a TFMR will probably always relive that feeling when they hear new baby news, even if you go on to have 2,3 or 10 Rainbows. We will feel it because pregnancy presents it’s self as risk – odds, numbers, age – whats the risk? Will I have this baby or not? “We’re having a baby!” – well, it’s not a done deal I’m afraid.

After the three second influx of absolute dread, you dust yourself off again and think logically. I have my Rainbow now and she was worth it all. And Thingy is pregnant? Oh wow! That’s amazing – how far along is she?

Coping during pregnancy, after TFMR

You find yourself wanting to NEVER say the words, “I’m pregnant”, in fear that it might just disappear at the click of a finger. That if you keep it a secret, you can keep it safe and not expose it to the cruelties of the world. Nothing can happen to it if no one knows about it.

The early days, before the twelve week scan, were the most anxious (of course). I expected to miscarry – I was down on my luck with what happened last time and it wasn’t going to happen for me (having a baby). Every toilet visit I was seeking out a blood stain and every twinge or cramp I thought, ‘This is it’. I was waiting for something bad to happen, that way when it did, I had already softened the blow by thinking the inevitable.

The morning of the first scan was a sickening experience. I thought back to last time – all the complications and tests, whispering doctors and the flicker of uncertainty in the air. Of course, I knew I would be high risk again, because of last time, so at least I knew that for sure.

The twelve week scan is the first hurdle. It’s not pleasant but it has to be done and there is absolutely every chance everything is fine. It’s so easy to say that and so easy to not feel it after a TFMR pregnancy but you have to think – what else can I do? I want a baby and this is the only way to it.

Right through to the twenty week scan, all my tests came back fine and I was fortunate to have a happy and healthy pregnancy. I was anxious through the whole thing but I found once I started telling people, I relaxed and enjoyed my pregnancy.

So apart from relaxing, how did I cope? KEEP BUSY.

I would advise anyone who is nervous and terrified in their new pregnancy to take on a new challenge – learn a new language, begin an evening course, join a local pilates or yoga class, practise Mindfulness or even take up knitting (cute booties right?)

My husband and I were renovating a house right through to when our Rainbow arrived. My days were filled with stripping and painting, queuing up in Screwfix, and tirelessly cleaning – dealing with having no kitchen for a whole summer! I was so busy and tired, my mind didn’t have time to think negative thoughts or ‘what if’s’. They saying is true, ‘The devil makes work for idle hands’.